Sanding

Discussion in 'Exterior/Body' started by Blasito, Mar 23, 2011.

  1. Blasito

    Blasito Enthusiast

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    Just wanted to know if any of you body workers can give me some advice on what grit paper to start with, and then graduate to for my '83 p'up. I'll be using an orbital sander or something similar. Any help is much appreciated.

    -Blasito
     
  2. Blasito

    Blasito Enthusiast

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  3. Zombie Monarch

    Zombie Monarch Veteran

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    The amount of times the truck has been painted in the past matters on how much you need to remove. Also if the truck was painted with lacquer paint, I have heard will cause problems if you paint over it with other types. However if you just wish to get paint to stick and don't really care if the paintjob will last for 5+ years, you can just use a scotch bright pad and scuff the whole truck up to knock off all the shine and paint over it. If you're trying to do a job that will last for a long time (Longer than 5 years) going to metal is going to be your best bet. As far as grits for sandpaper.. Paint will fill 80 grit scratches if you do it like you're suppose to and use good paints.
     
  4. mprtftr

    mprtftr Enthusiast

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    Not trying to start any arguments or anything, but I wouldn't use 80 grit unless there was rust that needed to be removed at which point you would want to hit bare metal to see how far down it goes. If there isn't major cancer on your ride and it doesn't have a lot of major dents and dings and you're willing to put in the work for a decent paint job, I would say start with 220 to get the gloss off. Then you can see if there are any imperfections that you couldn't see to start out with. If everything is still in good shape, then move to 320 and do a final sand. If there are problems, then you may have to go with a rougher grit. Like for instance, if you have spots where Bondo was CAKED on or there are PATCH panels that look a little shoddy, then you may have to go back over those with rougher grits and completely rework those sections and then work your way back up to the 320 grit. Once you've done a final sanding with 320, wipe it down with some general purpose cleaner (use the stuff from your local paint supplier) and a tack cloth and paint it the way you want it.
     
  5. jetas

    jetas Grand Toyotaholic

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    I try the start with 80 for bodywork. I hate smoothing out the scratches left behind from 40 grit. After 80 i go to 120 or 180. Then 220 to 320.

    Thats for bodywork. If the panel is good and jus needs to be resprayed then i go from 180, 220, 320. A scuffpad works but it doesnt completely get the gloss.

    Honestly theres many different opinions as to what works best and the proper procedure is. In the end ur guna do it your way. Ive changed how i do things many times. So far what i posted has given me the best results.
     
  6. TRUCK ACTION

    TRUCK ACTION Grand Toyotaholic

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    After the first sanding & before the paint I would seal all with primer,not rattle can stuff! Than final wet sand out with 400,than paint!Single or two stage.
    Just my 2cents!:cool:
     
  7. jetas

    jetas Grand Toyotaholic

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    I use rattle can on plastics but it doesnt cover good enough.
     
  8. 93_Toy_Mini

    93_Toy_Mini Addict

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    I'm sorry to have to revive an old thread but I had to reply so no one gets wrong information. Just to tell you about me so you don't say I'm blowing smoke up your @$$. I'm a graduate of UTI in '08 and I have been in the field ever since. Some of what everyone is saying is true. What grit you start with depends on what your doing. First it depends on your truck, has it been painted before, is there any dents that is going to need filler. First lets start with the posibility that you have a clean panel. The factory paint is a good base for a paint job and doesn't require complete removal. What you want to do is sand off the clear coat. I would start with 180 because it not too agressive but it still gives the primer layer something to grip to. You should apply two wet coats. Once you have primered the truck, start with 220 and work up to 400. Then you paint your sealer, and sand with 600. Now you are ready for your base coat. The rest depends on your paint scheme. Once you paint it depends on the how many coat of clear and the "show quality" quality you want. After you paint the clear you can buff it for a good shine but you will still have that "orange peel" effect. You can get rid of that by "cutting & buffing." The cutting part is wet sanding starting with 1500 up to 3000 and you follow that by buffing and you will get that mirror finish. Understand that this a crash course and there are a lot of variables. Ok but lets say you don't have a clean panel. Say you have dents, dings, rust or previous dent repair. For all of these you need an aggresive grit sand paper, I recommend 36 or 40. Nothing lower than that. Now I have been taught that if you find filler from a previous repair that you should leave it alone. However, in this business if something goes wrong its the fault of whoever worked on it last so I always take it down to bare metal. There are two reasons for using such an aggresive grit. One, you want to remove the material as quickly as possible. You can create too much heat and warp the panel by sanding with a less aggresive grit. Two, when using filler, it is important to give it something to grip to. Applying filler over 180 is not a good idea. It will fall off. An inportant thing to remember about sanding with that grit is not to over do it or you will thin the metal out. Also, use good filler, NOT bondo. Its wack! And don't layer it on too thick. An 1/8" is ideal but no more than 1/4". Anyway, after you have applied your filler, start with 80 grit with a block suitable for the size of the panel. Sand smooth and continue with the steps above. Hope this is helpful and let me know if you have questions. Thanks for reading!



     
  9. Dgerfan55

    Dgerfan55 Grand Toyotaholic

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    So after you sand all the paint down to bare metal then why do you need to apply filler? Do you have to apply filler over the whole area that you sanded down to metal? Man if i drove my truck up to you and left it with you would you sand and prep my truck for paint for me.
     
  10. ToxicToyz

    ToxicToyz Addict

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    Filler is only for dented or warped areas, dont aply to the whole sanded area jus give more work. As for grit when yuu start cutting down the filler use an 80 grit but dont sand all the way through because yuu need to step down to a 180 to finish it off or the scratches will be too deep. After all body work is done and primered wet samd with 320 or 400 grit...and use a sanding block!
     
  11. Litneon

    Litneon Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Another thing I learned when painting mine.

    When the sandpaper stops cutting, get a new piece.

    My buddy is a pro body and paint man and helped me with mine. I found out that in the process of trying to save paper and money, I was causing myself a lot more labor trying to use dull paper.
     
  12. 93_Toy_Mini

    93_Toy_Mini Addict

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    Like Toxic Toys said its to fill in any panel that isn't straight, meaning any panel that has dents, dings, or any rock chips like I said above. The filler should overlap the area of the spot that you are filling. If you sand the whole panel down to metal, you should mark the spots that need filler and if it seems like you'll need to cover the panel more than 60-70% then you might just do the whole panel. As for doing the work for you. I have done work for people before but I'd be missing work so I charge what they pay me there an hour which is $20. It also depends on how much work you need done. I can't miss weeks from work. Also, because of the weather and the house that I moved into, I would only be able to work from around 12 to 6PM.

     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2012
  13. Dgerfan55

    Dgerfan55 Grand Toyotaholic

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    Dang bro no TM discount? HAHAHA LOL
     
  14. TRUCK ACTION

    TRUCK ACTION Grand Toyotaholic

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    When using 220 & higher , go with wet/dry paper it will go much further! :cool:
     
  15. 93_Toy_Mini

    93_Toy_Mini Addict

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    Yeah, thats cool, as long as you're ok with me doing discount work. You get what you pay for. Why would I miss work if it wasn't worth it. Besides, shops charge you the labor rate which is $95+ an hour then materials. You want discount quality work go to miracles or maaco. They charge $300-$400 for the whole vehicle and it will last you a year. I'm charging $20 and it will last you more than 5 years. Thats a fraction of what you would pay at a shop.
     
  16. randy20r

    randy20r Member

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    theres no way in hell to do this over the internet you may need welding in new metal at some points or fiberglass or just a smidge of bondo start with 180 prime with direct to metal then 320 ,,prime with thined primer filler 400 then prime real thin then wet sand with 400 again and it can go on and on when blocking to get it rite ,,,, keep in mind you need lots and lots of hours at it to know the feel ... if ya want it slick i cant count the hours i have in mine , i know its over 5 month,s of just body work
     
  17. randy20r

    randy20r Member

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    180 to start with
     

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